WAC Houses Vie for the Iron Throne

Seven contenders still vie for power in the western lands, fighting for control over the Western Throne and the future of the realm. Alliances are forged and broken, ancient powers awakened, rivalries made, and the fates of these houses lie precariously in the balance. As the events unfold, each endeavors to win that most athletic of conflicts: The Games of WAC


Chicago State – Stark

In the cold, distant north, the Lords and Ladies of House Chicago State say, time and time again, WAC is coming. Known for their steadfast devotion, the members of this house prize duty above all other things. Their stark differences from the other houses drive them to seek the throne to protect their independence. The colors of House Chicago State are pine green and frost white, their sigil a solitary dire-cougar.


Grand Canyon – Tyrell

Stewards above all else, the house of Grand Canyon has always sought to serve. Yet their service has earned them a place among the other great houses, a position that forces them in the middle of the games of WAC. Seeing themselves as a desert rose among the other lawless houses, they are forever growing stronger, building their skill for battles to come. Their flags fly the purple, black, and white of their homelands, and they push ever forward for domination of the west.


Missouri-Kansas City – Baratheon

The House of Missouri-Kansas City has always been one of fighters. Throughout the generations their proud warriors have vanquished their enemies through deft feats that defy logic. Brave knights fight in the courts and fields for their honor, with awe inspiring moves of courage and ferocity. Usurpers and rebels, they wish to restore order to them realm. Their banners fly the noble blue and gold, and their golden kangaroo sigil.


New Mexico State – Arryn

High on their plateau kingdom, the lords and ladies of house New Mexico State are honor bound to protect the realm from the greedy smaller houses. An ancient line descending from the great Aggie kings of the Organ Mountains, their vale is a place of refuge where they train and prepare to take the Western Throne. Hesitant at first, they now enter the fray, banners flying the crimson and white of their rugged homeland.


Seattle U – Targaryen

One of the oldest and proudest houses, the brave members of House of Seattle University were once rulers, now fighting for what they see as rightfully theirs. Cast down by the other houses, they rise again, undaunted by the smaller enemies that would oppose them. Legends say that in ancient times, they were an old order of Jesuits who rode great red war hawks into battle. Their banners flow black and white, and distant caws can be heard when they enter the field. Though they are few, their warriors fight through fire and blood to take back their birthright.


Texas Pan-American – Martell

Hailing from the far south of the continent, the Texas Pan Americans have remained unbent, unbowed, and unbroken under the rule of the Western Throne. They differ greatly from the other great houses, their stark accents and strange customs setting them apart from their northern counterparts. The Texas Pan American Banner is a single defiant white star set against the orange and green of their homeland. Their words are prepare, discover, transform, and that is what they intend to do to the realm.


Utah Valley – Lannister

One of the most formidable houses, the members of Utah Valley are ambitious and cunning. Known for producing prominent merchants and financiers, their roars echo from the classroom to the court. Gold is their color, along with green, and their simple house motto is engage. With their badger sigil and perseverance, the proud members of House Utah Valley engage their plans for domination of the Western Throne.


Jason may be reached at jbono@su-spectator.com

The Spectator editorial board consists of Jenna Ramsey, Tess Riski, Christopher Salsbury, Nick Turner, Bill Goldstein, Shelby Barnes, Cameron Peters, and Mandy Rusch. Signed commentaries reflect the opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of the Spectator. The views expressed in these editorials are not necessarily the views of Seattle University.


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