The Guidance Counselor On Life After Graduation

Emily is not a licensed guidance counselor, but neither was Ann Landers.


Q:

Am I an a-hole if I think my girlfriend looks ugly when I wake up to her in the morning without makeup?


A:

You bet.


Q:

Hi Emily, I love your column. I’m graduating soon and I’m freaking out because I don’t have a job lined up. I don’t have my stuff together and everybody else does. Advice for keeping it together?


A:

Hi, anon, thank you! I think in your hysteria you may be misreading your peers—not everybody has their stuff together and many people don’t. Graduating is kind of like any other summer when you were in classes and now you’re not. Only this time, you’re bombarded with enthusiastic curiosity and probably some critique by everybody you know about your life henceforth. There’s nothing wrong with working the job you rocked when you were an enrolled student, volunteering, applying for internships, and other normal things. And actually, I’m gonna stress that one further. I feel that once you have a bachelor’s degree sometimes the mentality shifts to “I need to be paid for this,” but that’s not always the reality. You may still need to prove yourself with menial work and unpaid opportunities. Keep in contact with your professors because they could pass your info along to other potential employers in your field. As far as not freaking out, I guess I’d go to my usual suggestions: keep a to-do list, partake in self care more often than you think you should, prioritize yourself and your health, keep your space clean, try to cut back on partying, keep active, and cook yourself tasty meals.


Keep it real,
Emily

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